Periodontist - Cedar Rapids
1909 51st St NE
Cedar Rapids, IA 52402
319-294-4800

Posts for: July, 2018

DontTakeaVacationFromOralHygieneThisSummer

What are you most looking forward to this summer? Maybe you’re planning a trip to the beach, or a getaway in the woods…maybe even a journey to a faraway city or a foreign land. Wherever your holiday travel leads you, we hope it’s enjoyable and safe. And while you’re packing your bags, don’t forget to take a trio of important items that can help keep your vacation trouble-free: namely, a soft-bristled toothbrush, a tube of fluoride toothpaste, and a roll of dental floss.

If you have been careful about keeping up your oral hygiene all year, you’ve probably already noticed the rewards it can bring—like a sparkling smile, fresh breath, and good dental checkups. But even if you’re planning to get away from it all this summer, don’t take a vacation from oral hygiene. And if your oral hygiene routine could stand some improvement, maybe this is the time to make a fresh start.

Maintaining good oral health while you’re on the go doesn’t have to be a high-tech pursuit. You don’t need broadband service or a good mobile signal; you don’t even need electric power. Running water is nice, but not essential. And all the tools you need can fit easily in a travel bag.

The benefits of good oral hygiene are clear. Brushing twice every day and flossing once a day can effectively fight the bacteria that cause tooth decay and periodontal disease. That’s important any time of year, but perhaps even more so when you’re traveling because it’s harder to keep a healthy diet. Grabbing a sugary drink or a snack to go is convenient, but it provides food for the bacteria that can cause dental diseases; also, the acid in some soft drinks (even diet sodas) can wear away tooth enamel, leaving you with less protection against cavities.

Summer vacations can bring welcome surprises and unforgettable experiences. But needing urgent dental care in an unfamiliar place is the kind of surprise you can do without. So even though you may be far away from the routines of home, don’t take a vacation from your oral hygiene routine.  It takes just a few minutes, but it can keep your smile bright and healthy wherever you go.

If you would like more information about oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment.


NoahGallowaysDentallyDangerousDancing

For anyone else, having a tooth accidentally knocked out while practicing a dance routine would be a very big deal. But not for Dancing With The Stars contestant Noah Galloway. Galloway, an Iraq War veteran and a double amputee, took a kick to the face from his partner during a recent practice session, which knocked out a front tooth. As his horrified partner looked on, Galloway picked the missing tooth up from the floor, rinsed out his mouth, and quickly assessed his injury. “No big deal,” he told a cameraman capturing the scene.

Of course, not everyone would have the training — or the presence of mind — to do what Galloway did in that situation. But if you’re facing a serious dental trauma, such as a knocked out tooth, minutes count. Would you know what to do under those circumstances? Here’s a basic guide.

If a permanent tooth is completely knocked out of its socket, you need to act quickly. Once the injured person is stable, recover the tooth and gently clean it with water — but avoid grasping it by its roots! Next, if possible, place the tooth back in its socket in the jaw, making sure it is facing the correct way. Hold it in place with a damp cloth or gauze, and rush to the dental office, or to the emergency room if it’s after hours or if there appear to be other injuries.

If it isn’t possible to put the tooth back, you can place it between the cheek and gum, or in a plastic bag with the patient’s saliva, or in the special tooth-preserving liquid found in some first-aid kits. Either way, the sooner medical attention is received, the better the chances that the tooth can be saved.

When a tooth is loosened or displaced but not knocked out, you should receive dental attention within six hours of the accident. In the meantime, you can rinse the mouth with water and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (such as ibuprofen) to ease pain. A cold pack temporarily applied to the outside of the face can also help relieve discomfort.

When teeth are broken or chipped, you have up to 12 hours to get dental treatment. Follow the guidelines above for pain relief, but don’t forget to come in to the office even if the pain isn’t severe. Of course, if you experience bleeding that can’t be controlled after five minutes, dizziness, loss of consciousness or intense pain, seek emergency medical help right away.

And as for Noah Galloway:  In an interview a few days later, he showed off his new smile, with the temporary bridge his dentist provided… and he even continued to dance with the same partner!

If you would like more information about dental trauma, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”


4TipsforInstillingGoodFamilyHygieneHabits

Long-term dental health is built on a foundation of good hygiene habits instilled at an early age. Consistent, daily hygiene not only makes for healthy teeth and gums but an attractive smile too.

Here are 4 tips for encouraging your child to develop effective oral hygiene habits.

Begin teaching them to brush and floss on their own around age 6. Brushing and flossing are the primary ways to remove bacterial plaque from teeth, the main cause for dental disease. You should begin brushing your child’s teeth when they first appear; around age 6 you can begin encouraging them to brush for themselves and learn to floss.

Promote healthy eating and snacking habits. A nutritious diet is also important for maintaining healthy teeth and gums. Make sure your child is eating a varied, balanced diet of whole foods in appropriate portions. You should limit sugar and other carbohydrates (which accelerate growth of decay-causing bacteria) to mealtimes; offer limited, non-sugary snacks between meals.

Warn older children and teens about practices that are unhealthy for the mouth. As children enter their teen years, they’re under increased pressure from peers to try unhealthy practices. Oral piercings like tongue and lip bolts can increase tooth damage — chipping and wear — and gum recession, infection and bone loss. Tobacco use, both smoke and smokeless, can also cause tooth staining, increase the risk of decay, gum disease and oral cancer. Begin stressing the dangers these practices pose to their general and oral health before they reach puberty.

Practice what you teach.  Modeling healthy behavior you want your child to learn is just as important as instructing them how to do it. When they’re very young, brushing teeth should be a family affair — allow them to see how you brush your teeth as you help them brush theirs. And, if you’re not sure if your hygiene techniques are worthy of emulation, we’ll be glad to help you improve your effectiveness to pass on to the next generation.

If you would like more information on developing life-long dental habits with your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”




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